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You Can Negotiate Anything, Anywhere, Anytime

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Press Release for Third Edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro, How to Resolve Anything, Anytime, Anywhere


**FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE**Mary Greenwood’s Award-Winning How to Negotiate Like a Pro, Third Edition, adds new chapter on Negotiating with Difficult People.  


St. Augustine. – The Third Edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro; How to Negotiate Anything, Anytime, Anywhere, was published in September 8, 2017. Greenwood, has added a new chapter on How to Negotiate with Difficult People, including pathological liars, narcissists, and bullies. How to Negotiate Like a Pro gives the reader the tools to resolve any kind of dispute and reveals the preparations, strategies and tactics needed to close any deal.

Greenwood knows her book remains timely, and likely always will: “Everyone is involved in conflicts and disputes,” she says. A short list of some of the topics covered in her book include 1) how to negotiate with your spouse, 2) how to close the deal and 3) how to get the best salary and not leave money on the table. She includes the ten questions to get the best deal and has created 41 scripts to walk readers carefully through each stage of the negotiation.

Book Awards. The first two editions won 9 book awards: winner, DIY Book Festival; winner, Indie Excellence Book Awards; finalist, National Best Book Awards; finalist, Readers Favorite Book Awards, finalist, International Book Awards, finalist, ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards; runner-up in two categories, New York Book Festival; and honorable mention, London Book Festival. 

Greenwood is also the author of How to Mediate Like a Pro, 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, which has won 12 book awards, and How to Interview Like a Pro, 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job, which has also won 12 book awards. 


About the Author:With more than 30 years of dispute experience, as an attorney and a human resources professional, as well as stints as a union negotiator and a mediator, Greenwood has proven that her methods work. Her books have been used as textbooks in negotiation courses at University of Alaska, Nova Southeastern, Brown, University of Central Florida, DePaul University and North Texas University. 

Greenwood has been quoted in the Business News Daily, Money Magazine, the New York Daily News, Real Simple, State Farm magazine, CBS Money Watch,and Mediation Digest. 

Greenwood lives in St. Augustine with her Boston terrier, Annabelle. For review copies,contact Mary at mgreen464@aol.com. Visit www.MaryGreenwood.org.




Saturday, September 16, 2017


Mary Greenwood will be speaking about her new book, the third edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro, How to Resolve Anything, Anytime, Anywhere  at the Del Web Writers Group on Monday October 2, 2017 at 10:00 A.M. at the Anastasia Clubhouse in Ponte Vedra, Florida.


Third Edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro Just published



The Third Edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro; How to Resolve Anything, Anytime, Anywhere has just been published in September 2017.  There is a new chapter on How to Negotiate With Difficult People, including narcissists, pathological liars and bullies. It is now available at Iuniverse.com and will be available on Amazon and Kindle soon.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Third edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro published soon

The third edition of How to Negotiate Like a Pro, How to Resolve Anything, Anywhere, Anytime has been sent to the printer and will be live in a few days.


The new revised and updated edition has a new chapter on How to Negotiate with Difficult People, including pathological liars, bullies and narcissists. 

I will post a copy of the new cover as soon as it is "live"

Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Negotiate Like a Pro, How to Resolve Anything, Anywhere, Anytime, winner of 9 book awards, How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Dispute, Winner of 12 book awards and How to Interview Like a Pro, Winner of 12 book awards.

Saturday, May 6, 2017

How to Negotiate With Trump, Rule 3


During the first 100 days of Trump's presidency, we have heard a lot about Trump's negotiation skills. As the author of How to Negotiate like a Pro, 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, I decided to review my own rules in the age of Trump.


Mary's Rule 3: You Don't Have to Be Right to Settle.


Trump's Rule 3. I am Almost Always Right.


What are the three words we want to hear the most, sometimes even more than "I love you."  We want to hear "You are right." For some people this is even harder to say than "I love you." Even better is saying "You are absolutely right." When someone says that it is not the money that counts, it is the "principle," I know the negotiation is in trouble. When someone says it is the "principle," we know that he or she is still invested in their feelings in the dispute. 


We know that Donald Trump thinks he is almost always right even if there are pictures (the inauguration or the women's march) or facts to the contrary (just call it fake news.)  If someone thinks he is always right, facts, logic or arguments probably won't work. However you can use this to your advantage. Instead of trying to persuade the other person (Trump) that you are correct, instead change your tactics. Find something to agree with (no matter how small) or even apologize (more about that in a later post.)  Do something that allows the other side to stay within their "rightness." 


Getting past who is right and who is wrong is the key. Parties who are concerned with who is at fault rather than how to settle usually don't want to compromise. If you want the negotiation to move forward, you may have to be the first one to start the initiative and even accept some of the blame. If the other side is only interested in being right, chances are the situation won't be resolved. 


Script: 

I know you think this is my fault and maybe it is. How can we move forward to a solution. What do you want?


You are absolutely right. I made a big mistake. I want to apologize and hope you can forgive me. How can we proceed?




Mary Greenwood, Negotiator, Mediator, Arbitrator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of ten book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of 11 book awards; and How to Interview Like a Pro, 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job, Winner of 12 book awards. Email: mgreen464@aol.com, Visit www.marygreenwood.org

Friday, May 5, 2017

How to Negotiate With Trump, Rule 2


During the first 100 days of Trump's presidency, we have heard a lot about Trump's negotiation skills. As the author of How to Negotiate like a Pro, 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, I decided to review my own rules in the age of Trump.



Mary's Rule 2: Look Forward not Back. The Past is Called the Past for a Reason. 


Trump's Rule 2: Look Back not Forward. I like living in my past glory. 


One party may revel in detailing everything that has happened (and I mean everything) so far and insist on documenting each episode or incident even if they took place awhile ago. A wife in a divorce may be so intent on documenting everything the husband has done wrong that the wife is not even thinking about the goals of the negotiation beyond blaming the wife. 


Or a President may blame the past President for everything the  previous President has done in the last eight years. Or the President may dwell on the size of the inauguration crowds, hold rallies during the Correspondents' dinner or focus on the 3 million more votes his opponent received in the general election. However, looking to the past is counterproductive and does not help the negotiations.  


You have to figure out a way to get to the present and deal with the current issues that need to be resolved. Ask the party what they want to resolve the dispute today. If the other side can't let the past go, resolving any negotiation can be a problem. 


Script


1. If we are going to resolve this, we need to look to the future not the past.


2. How exactly do you want to resolve this issue?







Mary Greenwood, Negotiator, Mediator, Arbitrator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of ten book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of 11 book awards; and How to Interview Like a Pro, 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job, Winner of 12 book awards. Email: mgreen464@aol.com, Visit www.marygreenwood.org




How to Negotiate Like Trump, Rule 1


During the first 100 days of Trump's presidency, we have heard a lot about Trump's negotiation skills. As the Author of How to Negotiate Like a Pro; 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, I decided to review my own rules in the age of Trump.

Mary's Rule 1:  Focus on the Goal. Don't be Distracted by Your Emotions.

Trump's Rule 1:  Focus on Your Emotions. Don't be Distracted by Your Goals


When I wrote How to Negotiate Like a Pro, I said it is important to check your emotions at the door before trying to negotiate because emotions such as anger can make one lose control. We have all seen someone who gets red in the face and starts shaking his finger and generally looks as though he could easily have a heart attack. Sometimes that person is so angry that he is incoherent. Now many years after writing that, I realize that person could be Donald Trump. 


If I am dealing with someone who is very emotional and upset, how do I handle it?


If the other side is baiting me, I remain calm and do not give any indication that the insults or bullying have any affect on me.  I try to keep a poker face. If I do start getting upset, I ask for a break  and try to compose myself and take a few deep breaths before coming back to the negotiating table. I tell myself that it does not matter whether I like the other side or not. My goal is to resolve the problem. 


Script:

I am going to pretend I did not hear that comment and move right along, but consider this a warning that such comments will not be tolerated in the future.





Mary Greenwood, Negotiator, Mediator, Arbitrator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of ten book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of 11 book awards; and How to Interview Like a Pro, 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job, Winner of 12 book awards. Email: mgreen464@aol.com, Visit www.marygreenwood.org

Friday, September 26, 2014

How to Negotiate Like a Pro and How to Mediate Like a Pro are texts at Nova Southeastern

How to Mediate Like a Pro and How to Negotiate Like a Pro are required textbooks in the Fall 2014 Semester at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida for its online Alternate Dispute Resolution Course, which is part of the Masters Degree in Science Program.

How to Mediate Like a Pro has won 13 book awards and How to Negotiate Like a Pro has won nine book awards.




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney

Friday, August 8, 2014

Book Signing on Saturday September 20, 2014 from 4:00 to 6:00 at BooksPlus Bookstore Fernandina Beach

Authors in the Round, Saturday September 20, 2014, at BooksPlus Bookstore

From 4:00 to 6:00, Ten Authors, including Mary Greenwood

Wine Tasting plus book signing

Address: 1743 A S. 8th St., Fernandina Beach, Intersection of T.J. Courson and 8th St in Nassau Diamond Building across from Compass Bank.

Call. for more info: 904-261-0303

www.booksplus.amelia.com

BooksPlus Bookstore specializes in local authors



Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of 9 book awards, How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes Winner of 13 book awards, How to Interview Like a Pro, Winner of 12 book awards,
Visit www.MaryGreenwood.org

Friday, June 6, 2014

How Book Awards Can Help Your Marketing Effort: The Good, Bad and the Ugly.

When applying for book awards, you need to use some common sense and caution.



Getting awards is fun (the Good), but you don't want your money to be wasted (the Bad) or even be scammed (the Ugly.)

Here are some things to look at when deciding whether to enter an award contest.

1. What is the cost?

Some think that any cost is too much and won't enter an awards contest that costs anything. My view is that $50 is a good price point. If you do win, where can you get that kind of publicity for $50? In addition, there are some administrative costs to running an awards event and that seems reasonable to me. I won't apply for a contest that costs $150 or more. You have to wonder where that money is going.



2. How often is the book award contest conducted?

If more than once a year, I am a little suspicious. Also if I don't win one year, I am not going to try again. I already have an idea what they think of my book and I don't have to pay more money to find out for sure. If anything, there is more competition the next year.

3. If an award asks for personal information like passport number or drivers license number, run for the hills!



If you read the instructions and see that you have to give personal information, you may be setting yourself up for a scam. Usually you have a choice on how to pay. I like to write a check even though it takes longer to get there. I also like to pay with PayPal. If you are requested to pay before you get instructions, then you know you are being scammed.


4. What is the prize? Don't give away your rights.

If the prize is a publishing contract, be sure to read the rules very carefully. You don't want to give away the rights to your book. Is this really a contest or a way for publisher to get you to pay a fee a book contract or a way to get you to pay a big fee for editing.



5. What is the prize? Be wary of winning an entry in an anthology

There may be legitimate anthologies for poetry or a specific topic, of course. However, if your prize is the opportunity to be in an anthology and you get the right to sell copies of that anthology, you may want to rethink that. Who is going to read this anthology except for the authors?



6. What is the prize? A trophy but you must pay for it.

Now if you are charged $5 or $10 to get a medal, that is reasonable, but if you have to pay $100 or more for a trophy, that seems excessive. You have to ask yourself, who is making the money?



7. What is the prize? Money, judges' comments, website listings, stickers, trip to award ceremonies, book festivals and press releases.

I like book awards because of the Public Relations for my books. The book awards may send an email or press release that can be shared to your friends and contacts. Money is nice, but usually that is only for the grand prize winner. Judges' comments can be useful, but sometimes they can also be annoying. Lately a judge criticized my book on interviewing because it didn't have anything on resumes. Well there are plenty of books on resumes, but mine is about interviewing! It is usually too late to make any changes anyway so I don't ask for judges' comments anymore.



Often the book award will list your book on its website. If you get that opportunity, be sure to do that. Often there will be a link to Amazon or Barnes and Noble to buy your book so that can be another revenue stream. Others will give you stickers or charge a small fee for them. My experience with stickers is that they fall off and can look unseemly. I don't put them on my books anymore, but it is nice to take a photo of the sticker for your website or blog. Often the grand prize winner will get a trip to the awards or a weekend at a writers retreat. This is nice but remember only one person gets this. You will have a better chance getting a prize in your category.

8. Who are the judges?

Read the fine print and see who the judges are. When the books are part of a reviewers' book awards, such as Readers Views and Readers Favorites, the books will be reviewed as well as judged. Be careful if the rules say the judges will read only a certain percentage of the book. We all know it may not take long to tell whether a book is award material, but you want your book to be read.



9. Who are the sponsors and how long has the award existed?

The book awards are usually sponsored by publishers, publisher organizations, reviewers, and book festivals. The Eric Hoffer Book Awards were previously called Writers Notes and a few years ago got permission from the Eric Hoffer Estate to use his name. The Writers Digest has been around for 20 years and the IPPY Awards for 16 years. Just because an award is new does not mean I won't enter it since it is also a way to get on the ground floor for something new. If I like the concept, I will go ahead and enter.

Book Awards have really helped me in my marketing effort. If you follow some of the guidelines above, you will be entering book contests like a pro!

See my previous post for some more tips on book awards.



Mary Greenwood, Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of 13 book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of 13 book awards; and How to Negotiate Like a Pro, winner of 10 book awards.