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Tuesday, December 6, 2011

How to Interview Like a Pro Awarded Readers Choice by iUniverse













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Universe Publishing has just announced that How to Interview Like a Pro; 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job has been awarded the Readers Choice designation based on its sales in retail outlets.

Greenwood's book already has the Rising Star and Editor's Choice designation. How to Interview Like a Pro has won eleven book awards.


Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards and How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards.

Email: howtointerview@aol.com; website: www.marygreenwood.org

Friday, December 2, 2011

Second Column on Book Awards at WritingRaw.com

How Book Awards Can Boost
Your Marketing Campaign

There are over 1.4 million book titles in print and about 200,000 new titles each year in the USA and Canada. Being a new author with a new book can be daunting especially if you are self-published and responsible for your own marketing. Being a winner of a book award can instantly bring you credibility and help you promote your book. Winning book awards can really help boost your marketing campaign. Readers want to read award-winning books; book sellers and librarians want to stock award-winning books and journalists want to write about award-winning books.
In this column, I will talk about the advantages and disadvantages of applying for book awards.

Advantages:
First of all winning a book award is a morale booster for the writer. It gives recognition for a solitary profession. A writer may have doubts about whether a book is any good, but a couple of book awards can dispel those doubts. You can now call yourself an award-winning author and this is a relatively inexpensive way to get publicity for your books. (Book awards cost $50.00 to $150.00 to enter.) When one gets an award, one can make it a media event. If you win more than one book award, you can call yourself a multi-award winning author and that is even better!
Being a award-winning author can help you open new doors and get new contacts. You can attend book festivals and galas when you win the award. You can also get some good tax deductions. It can help you get a Book Club gig or be a featured speaker. It can help you sell foreign rights or make the leap from self-published writer to a writer with a publisher. It is also a nice way to meet other award-wining authors.
Book awards are a good alternative for shy writers who don't want to be in the public eye and speak about their books. Winning book awards speaks for itself. Book awards are also a good alternative if the writer is unable or unwilling to go on the book tour/lecture circuit.

Disadvantages:
Of course, not winning book awards can be demoralizing and can get fairly expensive so start slowly. We are not talking about the Pulitzer Prize or the Booker Award so look out for book awards that might not be prestigious enough for your book. Many companies that sponsor book awards are businesses and provide services, which they are also selling. Once your know the pros and cons, you can decide whether to go forward.

Mary's Tips for Entering Book Awards

1. Do your research and go slowly.

2. Look at the categories to see if you have a match. (Look at last year's titles). For example my titles are in "How to", "Self-Help.
"Business", "Career" and "Law."

3. Enter one or two and see how it goes.

4. To increase your odds, enter in two categories. Usually there is a discount for the second entry.

5. Pick a category where there may be fewer entries.

6. Be aware of cost. At $50.00 you can enter two or three contests instead of one $150.00 one.

7. Read instructions carefully. How many copies? What is deadline? postmark date?

8. See if list of books already entered (Florida Book Awards.)

9. Look at what is offered to winners: comments, free website listings, press release, stickers, book festival, award ceremonies,
and literary agent.

10. See if there are book awards just for your discipline or for your state (New Mexico Book awards.)

Next month, I will cover specific book awards.






Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards; How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of eleven book awards.
Email: Howtointerview@aol.com. website www.marygreenwood.org

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Mary Greenwood an Exhibitor at the Melbourne Florida Book Fair for Authors


















Mary Greenwood will be exhibiting her books: How to Negotiate Like a Pro, How to Mediate Like a Pro and How to Interview Like a Pro at the Authors Book Fair in Melbourne, Florida.

Here are the specifics:


Saturday & Sunday, November 19 & 20, 2011
Time: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Coincides with the Eau Gallie Art Festival

Eau Gallie Civic Center
1551 Highland Avenue
Melbourne, Florida 32935

In conjunction with Art Works:
Eau Gallie Fine Arts Festival






Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards, How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards, and How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of eleven book awards. Email: howtointerview@aol.com; website www.marygreenwood.org

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Mary Greenwood is one of the New and Emerging Authors at the Dahlonega Literary Festival November 12-13







The Dahlonega Literary Festival would like to welcome our New and Emerging Authors for the 2011 Festival. Come check them out and support our authors! WE will be exhibiting our books on Saturday, November 12, at St. Lukes Catholic Church Parish from 9:00 to 6:00 and on Sunday November 13, at Hancock Park. Please stop by and say hello if you are in the area.

New and Emerging 2011

William Anderson, God’s Arm
Tori Bailey, Coming Home
Chuck Barrett, The Savannah Project
Kenn Bivins, Pious
Dyan Crawford, Christina and the Lazy Day Surprise
Shane Etter, Bottom Dwellers
Amber Evans, The Wrath
Robert Faulkender, Filtered by Time: A True Story of Success in Vietnam
Sharon and David Goodwill, The Chief Executive Survival Kit, Simple Foods for Complex People, Peter Geter and Friends
Jonathan Grant, Chain Gang Elementary; The Way It Was in the South: The Black Experience in Georgia
Mary Greenwood, How to Mediate Life a Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes; How to Interview Like a Pro: 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job
Chad Hepler, Intervention: Anything But My Own Skin
Katandra Jackson, The Diary of a Bride to Be
Emory Jones, White County 10; Distant Voices: The Story of the Nacoochee Valley Indian Mound
Elizabeth Madson, Pieces of the Past; Tuffy; The Favor; The Contract
George W. Martin, I Will Give Them One More Shot”: Ramsey’s 1st Regiment Georgia Volunteers
Ashland Menshouse (Robert Thompson), The Last Seer and the Tomb of Enoch
Jeremy Owens, What is Life and Who Am I?
Angela Sasser, Angelic Visions
Melody Scott, Auraria Dead
Richard L. Stewart, Jr., The Amherst Protocol (Richard Lionel)
James R. Tuck, " He Stopped Loving Her Today," (short story in One Buck Horror anthology); Blood and Bullets, 2/2012
Luanne White, Thief of Innocence




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author ofHow To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, winner of six book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards; email, How to Interview@aol.com; website: www.MaryGreenwood.org

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

How to Interview Like a Pro by Mary Greenwood is Finalist in Business/Career Category in USA Books News Book Awards












How to Interview Like a Pro; 43 Rules For Getting Your Next Job is a finalist in the Business/Career Category in the USA Book News Book Awards. This is the 11th book award for Mary Greenwood's latest book.

Here are the other ten book awards:
1. Winner, Reader Views Awards
2. Winner Pinnacle Achievement Awards
3. Winner, Indie Excellence Awards
4. Winner, ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards career category
5. Finalist, Next Generation Indie Book Awards
6. Finalist, Eric Hoffer Awards
7. Honorable Mention DIY Book Festival
8. Honorable Mention Readers Favorite, business/finance category
9. Extra Mention, Millennium Puboishing Book Awards
10.Honorable Mention Mention, New York Book Festival


http://www.usabooknews.com/images/637_usabestbooks2011awards.jpg


Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author ofHow To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, winner of six book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards; email, How to Interview@aol.com; website: www.MaryGreenwood.org

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

My First Column on Book Awards for Writing Raw















It Is Nice to be Recognized

Like many things in life, my best book award was my first book award so my first column is about that experience. Future columns will be about individual awards and what to do when you get one.

When I won my first book award (Best "How To" Book, DIY Book Festival) for How to Negotiate Like a Pro, I was very excited and felt validated as a writer. I had been involved in the lonely art of writing a book with little feedback from others. I was not sure if it was a "good" book or not. I liked it and it really boosted my spirits to know that someone else liked it, too. I was thrilled that I could now write, "Mary Greenwood, award-winning author" on my marketing materials.

All the winners of the DIY (Do It Yourself) Book Festival Awards were invited to an awards banquet in October in Los Angeles, California. It was only a few weeks away and I could hardly afford it, but I said to myself, "Mary, you may never win another book award so you owe it to yourself to go." I made my airline and hotel reservation using frequent flyer miles. Since this was Hollywood, I thought I might get discovered just like all those famous actresses at Hollywood and Vine.

When I arrived at my hotel in the Hollywood Hills, it had no record of my reservation and even worse it was totally booked. I must have sounded desperate. "I am a writer and I am getting an award tonight and I really need a room." The desk clerk, who was also a budding writer, said that there were apartments above the hotel that they owned and that there was a vacancy.

He said that he would show me the apartment, which Jerry Bruckheimer used when he needed peace and quiet to write. I was thinking that if it was good enough for Jerry Bruckheimer, it would be good enough for me! The apartment was very sparse and a little dumpy, but it did have a killer view of the Hollywood Sign. I was wondering where exactly Jerry Bruckheimer wrote in this apartment and what he was working on. Of course, I said I would take it and forgot about the nice hotel room below.

I went to the Awards Ceremony and got my award; it was very nice to be recognized. However, It was a little anti-climactic because the highlight of my trip was the "fact" that I stayed in the same apartment as Jerry Bruckheimer. Since then I have had a nagging feeling that the desk clerk made up a story so I would take the apartment, but it could be true.

Whenever I see the closing credits of CSI, I ask myself whether he was working on the script for that or was it the Pirates of the Caribbean?




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate Like A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards; How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of ten book awards.
Email: howtointerview@aol.com; websites: www.howtointerviewlikeapro.org;
www.marygreenwood.org

Friday, October 28, 2011

Mary Greenwood exhibiting at Dahlonega GA Literary Festival November 12 and 13













I will be exhibiting my books: How to Interview Like a Pro, How to Mediate Like a Pro and How to Negotiate Like a Pro at the Dahlonega, Georgia Literary Festival. On Saturday, November 12, the Book Fair will be held at St. Lukes Catholic Church Parish from 9:00 to 6:00 and on Sunday November 13, the Book Fair will be held at Hancock Park. Please stop by and say hello if you are in the area.

About the Dahlonega Literary Festival & Writer's Seminar:

The Dahlonega Literary Festival is a yearly event that takes place the second weekend in November. Set in Historic Downtown Dahlonega, the festival continues to grow and become more and more entertaining as the years go on. All festival events are free and open to the public. This year (2011) marks the first year of the correlating New Directions Conference on the campus of North Georgia College and State University. The conference, while connected, is a seperate event and does require registration. For more information, check out our "Writer's Seminar" page.

History of the Dahlonega Literary Festival and Writer's Conference

Begun in 2004 by Kate Quigley McElliott, the Dahlonega Literary Festival celebrates books, writers, literacy, storytelling and literary performance art. Late in December, 2003, Kate called together a group of interested community and university people to begin The Dahlonega Literary Festival & Writer’s Seminar.







Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate Like A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards; How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of ten book awards.
Email: howtointerview@aol.com; websites: www.howtointerviewlikeapro.org;
www.marygreenwood.org

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Kindle Highlights from Amazon for How to Interview Like a Pro









Kindle Amazon Highlights from How to Interview Like a Pro






Amazon's Highlights program is a real eye opener for the author. It gives the author a window to those passages that resonate with her readers. If you are not familiar with the program, scroll down any Kindle listing and you will see the Highlights. It is great tool for authors and readers.

Here are the highlights from How to Interview Like a Pro; 42 Rules for Getting the Job You Want:

1. Ask what the company’s expectations are for this position. This allows the applicant to see what the company is looking for and can respond accordingly.
Highlighted by 5 Kindle users

2. This is not just a job for me. This is the place I want to be, and I am passionate about working in this field.
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

3.What is your management style and how do you interact with your employees?
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

4. Ask questions about the organization chart.
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

5. Ask what brought the interviewer to this company and what he or she likes best about working there. I love this question because you are doing the interviewing now but in a positive way.
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

6. What kind of training will be provided and who will do it? 3. Who was formerly in the position and why did they leave?
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

7. I can be a perfectionist, but I am taking measures to overcome this. I realize that everything I write does not have to be perfect to be acceptable.
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users

8.In this economy, you need to show the future employer why it needs you and how your experience and expertise are going to help it. This is where your research comes into play.
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users

9. What exactly will be my job duties? I have read the job description, I but don’t know what the priorities are.
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate Like A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards; How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of ten book awards.
Email: howtointerview@aol.com; websites: www.howtointerviewlikeapro.org;
www.marygreenwood.org

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

How to Interview Like a Pro Reviewed by Mir Haynes, Resume Expert



“How to Interview Like a Pro: Forty-Three Rules for Getting Your Next Job” by Mary Greenwood is the latest how-to book from the author of “How to Negotiate Like a Pro” and “How to Mediate Like a Pro.”

"How To Interview Like a Pro" delivers the kind of instructive and sound advice that job candidates need. It’s a quick read, too; I envision job seekers downloading and reading it one day, then acing an all-important job interview the next. For readers of the digital version, like myself, the book is available within moments of purchase and its page layout and font are readable and screen-friendly.

Whether you buy the eBook or paperback, Greenwood delivers a superb interviewer’s toolkit. Her advice ranges from the detailed and practical (if a company you interviewed with said they'd let you know in two weeks, wait three to call) to the philosophical and subtle (be observant when you take a tour of the office where you're interviewing, watching interactions, environment, and personnel for “red flags”). She maintains this balance throughout the book, as she covers all phases of the interview process: Getting organized and prepared ahead of time; researching the company you’re interviewing with (and, importantly, their competitors); making the most of your professional, personal, and online social networks; the nuts and bolts of the interview (everything from the right handshake and what to wear to useful advice about out-of-town interviews and reimbursement for travel expenses).

Job seekers will appreciate the entire chapter Greenwood dedicates to common interview questions and sample answers. Providing actual verbiage you can familiarize yourself with and customize to suit your situation, Greenwood draws from her years of experience interviewing with law firms and high-power executive offices to give you answers to sticky questions like “What is your greatest failure?” and “What don’t you like about your current job?” and “Tell me about your best boss.”

The book wraps with a chapter dedicated to knowing the law and whether you are in a protected category (did I mention that Greenwood is a lawyer?), sensible tips on how to navigate the post-interview waiting game, what to do if you did—or didn’t—get the job, and appendices on interviewing do’s and don’ts, terminology, federal discrimination laws, and state fair employment agencies.

Greenwood’s book is absorbing, timely, and informative. She writes in a “helpful friend” voice and sprinkles in numerous anecdotes, which makes the book entertaining and easy to read. As a professional resume writer and online job search expert, I have been looking for an interview-preparation book that I can recommend to my clients. I have finally found it!



Mir Haynes is a professional resume writer, social media expert, and author of “Resume to Payday: Online Secrets to Find and Land Your Dream Job.” Connect with her via Twitter (@RTP_Resumes) or www.rtpresumes.com.




Mary Greenwood, email: howtointerview@aol.com websites: www.marygreenwood.org, www.howtointerviewlikeapro.org

Friday, October 14, 2011

Mary Greenwood Will be Exhibiting her Multi-Award Winning Books at the Deltona Authors Fair Saturday October 15, 2011,

















The Deltona Authors Book Fair will be held Saturday October 15, 2011, at the Deltona Regional Library, 2150 Eustace Avenue, Deltona, FL. from 11:00 to 3:00 P.M.

Over 50 local authors will be exhibiting and selling their books. Some of the authors attending are John Ayers, Donna Banks, Kathleen Beals, Barbara Cameron, Doroty Dubel, Diana Hartling(who is at my table 10A,)Lucy Tobias, and Kimberlee Williams.

I will be exhibiting How to Negotiate Like a Pro, winner of six book awards, How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards, and How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of ten book awards, which has been quoted in the NY Daily News, Kiplinger Retirement Report, Career Column MSNBC, CBS Money Watch, State Farm Good Neighbor Magazine and many career blogs.,

My booth is 10B. There are some great workshops for authors, which I am attending, before the Book Fair. I am very interested in hearing about how to do a book tour.

If you are in the area, stop by and say hello. It should be a lot of fun!


Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate Like A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, winner of ten book awards, How to Mediate Like a Pro, winner of twelve book awards, and How to Negotiate Like a Pro, winner of six book awards. Email: howtointerview@aol.com www.marygreenwood.org

Monday, October 10, 2011

Review of "From Resume to Payday: Online Secrets to Find and Land Your Dream Job by Mir Haynes


Mir Haynes Has Done the Work So You Don't Have To.

Mir Haynes has written "From Resume to Payday: Online Secrets to Find and Land Your Dream Job," based on her experience as a professional resume writer.

Her philosophy is simple "Discover > Position > Share. Ms. Haynes' ebook is no-nonsense, practical and reassuring. Right from the start, she says, "You've got a job to find and time is of the essence." By her own admission, she is very organized and, if you read the book, some of those organizational skills will rub off on you.

She gives common sense advice, but as we all know, common sense is not all that common. She points out that her plan is "beautiful in its simplicity." Here are some examples: 1. Don't waste time surfing the net; 2. Have a plan; 3. Strategize. 

Ms. Haynes has some tricks of the trade up her sleeve that she is willing to share. She explains how to use google alerts to find out about your dream job. I use google alerts for articles about me or my books, and I never thought of using google alerts for job leads, but I think it is genius. She explains how you you can do a detailed google search and find out information others might miss. She also gives tips on a "failproof way to find niche job boards." 

Ms. Haynes explains how social media can help you get a job. She gives down to earth advice about Linkedin, Facebook, and Twitter. I always think of Linkedin as a Facebook for professionals and agree that Facebook, if continued, should be private. We have all heard of stories about a picture on Facebook that shows the applicant in an unflattering light and guess who does not get the job? She even explains how to get rid of tagged pictures on Facebook.  One has to be vigilant as to what is included.

Ms. Haynes goes into great detail on how Linkedin recommendations can help your job search. The resume picture and your name should be the same on all these forms of media. Ms. Haynes is very strategic. There are certain types of information that can be used on Linkedin to supplement what is in your resume. 

Her conclusion tackles five areas. 1. Make technology work for you. 2. Target and customize. 3. Do personal branding. 4. Be proactive and 5. Be professional. Finding a job is a daunting task and many don't really know where to begin.  Ms. Haynes takes away much of the mystique of finding a job. Buy this book, take her advice, and find a job.

by Mary Greenwood, Attorney, Human Resources Director and Author, How to Interview Like a Pro; 43 Rules For Getting Your Next Job. website:www.marygreenwood.org and email: howtointerview@aol.com. Mary has been quoted in the NY Daily News, Kiplinger Retirement Report, CBS Money Watch and State Farm Good Neighbor Magazine, among others.

by Mir Haynes, Professional Resume Writer and SEO Consultant. Find her online at www.rtpresumes.com and www.AnaboStudios.com.




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of ten book awards
www.marygreenwood.org

Friday, October 7, 2011

Mary Greenwood, author of How to Interview Like a Pro quoted in "11 Warning Signs Your Career Has Stalled" in NY Daily News






11 warning signs your career has stalled
By Charles Purdy
Monster Senior Editor

Thursday, October 6th 2011,


Your career can lose power for many reasons: a lack of opportunities, industry changes and plain old boredom are just a few of them.

Are you wondering whether your career has stalled? Here are some of the top warning signs, according to experts:

1. Your role and responsibilities haven't changed in a few years or more.

2. You've bounced from employer to employer without much change in job title or salary.

3. You can't remember the last time you learned something new about your industry or field.

4. People hired after you have been promoted faster than you.

5. You're not invited to important discussions or meetings of the kind you used to attend.

6. You have fewer job duties than you used to.

7. Your performance reviews contain terms like "consistently meets expectations" or "adequate performance."

8. No one at work asks for your help -- or no one in your professional network asks for advice.

9. You dread going to work in the morning.

10. Your manager and coworkers stop communicating with you -- in general, your phone rings less and you get fewer emails.

11. You spend a lot of time complaining about work, or and when you tell stories about work, you are the story's "victim," not its hero. Sound familiar? Never fear -- there are plenty of ways to get your career back in the fast lane. Here are some ideas:

Talk to Your Boss

A first step is to address problems head-on. For instance, if you've been stalled in the same position at the same employer, request a copy of the title hierarchy and job descriptions in your organization, says Debra Yergen, author of the Creating Job Security Resource Guide. "Work with human resources and your boss to find out what steps you need to take to move from where you are to the next step up,” she says.

Alternatively, tell your boss you're ready for new challenges and new assignments. If you've been quietly doing your job and keeping your head down, he may not realize that you're feeling unfulfilled.

Ask for What You Need

Alan G. Bauer, president of recruiter Bauer Consulting Group, says you can ask your manager for tips on what you need to improve. Also, he says you can ask your HR department what's going on with an overdue raise. "If your merit increases are lower than your coworkers', there may be an issue,” he says. "The company budgeted a certain amount for salary increases -- if you aren't getting your share, you need to find out why."

Brad Karsh, founder and president of the career-services firm JobBound, says to look for ways to be more effective, efficient and strategic. "Ask your manager about the possibility of a rotational program to see the inner workings of the company and gain fresh perspective and new ideas," he says.

Take Initiative
Karsh also suggests figuring out what keeps your boss up at night. "Find a way to solve that problem,” he says. "You need to be a key player."

You can also take some classes or work toward a degree, suggests Mary Greenwood, author of How to Interview Like a Pro.
Or consider on-the-job training. "If you value continuous learning, you can volunteer for a project that will require new skills,” says executive coach Elene Cafasso. "Perhaps you can transfer to another area of the business or learn what's needed to back up a coworker."

Rick Dacri, author of Uncomplicating Management, suggests getting actively involved in a professional association. "Get a leadership role, speak before the group or write an article for the newsletter, for instance," he says.

Adjust Your Attitude

Negativity is one of the worst career killers. "If you are spending a great deal of your energy moaning and whining about your circumstances, it's time to try and make a new start before you become so emotionally expensive that the organization feels the need to cut you," says Cy Wakeman, author of Reality-Based Leadership.

Identifying your dissatisfaction and taking steps to resolve it is the first step. The next step may be to update your resume and start looking for a new job. "It may be that hanging on to an unhealthy or unproductive employment relationship is what's holding you back,” Yergen says. "I've witnessed a handful of people this year who have identified their dissatisfaction and set a date to quit -- even without a job waiting -- and found something just before or just after the date of their resignation. Sometimes you just have to take that step."

If your career is stalled, perhaps a new career is the right answer. Start exploring options by reaching out to your professional network, job shadowing or talking to your HR department about an internal transfer.





Mary Greenwood, email howtointerview@aol.com website: www.marygreenwood.org

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Pictures from Heritage Book Festival, St. Augustine

Here are some photos of the Heritage Book Festival in St. Augustine, Florida
You can see beautiful Flagler College and my Boston Terrier, Annabelle


















howtointerview@aol.com www.marygreenwood.com

Review of How to Interview Like a Pro by Carolyn Howard-Johnson at MyShelf.com



Another Review at MyShelf.Com

How to Interview Like A Pro
Forty-Three Rules for Getting Your Next Job
Mary Greenwood. JD. LLM

iUniverse
release/ ASIN: B004JHZ26C
Kindle Edition
Kindle / paperback

Reviewed by Carolyn Howard-Johnson

A book for its time…

The Feel-Good Guide for Getting a Job and
Learning Negotiating Skills

Who would have guessed.

I read this book because I thought I might be able to recommend it to my retail clients, but it turns out, getting a job is very much like selling a book! So it’s suitable in many ways for my author-clients, too.

Getting a job isn’t much different than it was back in the days when I interviewed at PR firms and magazines like Good Housekeeping. Though we have many tools at our disposal that weren’t available back then, the basics are similar. And industry-to-industry, we can learn so much from the general (yet detailed!) information Mary Greenwood gives us in How To Interview Like a Pro. Basic business skills like Greenwood imparts here, are useful at some level for almost anyone who must earn a living.

Mary’s number two rule is that a job hunter must “prepare a good elevator speech.” She also says, “Make a list of everyone you know.” Ajob hunter would then use that list to find influential people with contacts of their own who will lead them to other jobs, recommend them to others, and generally hold their hands through the process.

Going hand in hand with this process is Mary’s rule “Telling everyone you know you are looking for a job.” She, expands this rule by adding: “Tell everyone whom you would like to know you are looking for a job.” Here she covers making new contacts using social networking.

Mary’s rules are born of experience, both general and legal. Her book moves us along from rule to rule—lickety split—right down to the never-nevers like: “Never say you don’t have any more questions.” Interviews go both ways. If they don’t, the interviewer may form some opinions you’d just as well he or she didn’t.

One of the reason things move so quickly is Greenwood’s anecdotes. You’ll come away from this book feeling as if you aren’t alone in your search and knowing how to make sure you aren’t. You’ll know the basics and the details, like how to answer about any question an interviewer is likely to ask.

One of the best things about this book is Greenwood’s Introductory Rule: “Getting a job is like parking. You have to be at the right place at the right time.” If you keep that in mind—along with her little protractor story (yes, this is a tease—I think you should read this book!), you’ll hang in there and know one day you’ll be exactly in that place at that time.

Now, here’s the thing. I believe that almost anyone in the business world could benefit from this book, from interviewee to interviewer. from author to retailer to IT guy or gal. Sometimes the books we get the most from are the ones we don’t think we need in the moment. Have it ready. It’s way more than a get-a-job book.

Reviewer & Columnist Carolyn Howard-Johnson is the award-winning author of The Frugal Book Promoter
Reviewed 2011
© 2011 MyShelf.com



Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of twelve book awards and How to Interview Like a Pro; 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job, winner of ten book awards. Email: howtointerview@aol.com website: www.marygreenwood.com

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Review of The Guide to Getting Paid: Weed Out Bad Paying Customers, Collect on Past Due Balances, and Avoid Bad Debt by Michelle Dunn







The Guide to Getting Paid: Weed Out Bad Paying Customers, Collect on Past Due Balances, and Avoid Bad Debt (Hardcover)







Michelle Dunn is an expert in her field and has won many book awards and honors and it shows. Her new book, The Guide to Getting Paid, is a must-read book in the credit field. Dunn draws on her expertise in the field as well as her own credit issues while going through a divorce. What I like most about this book is how thorough she is. She has lots of lists, explains the common mistakes, gives definitions of terms, and anticipates most questions.

She walks the reader through the process in down-to-earth language in a format that is very readable. She has done her research and has lots of interesting quotes. One that surprised me was that "Americans spend 70% of gross income repaying debt."

This book really is the soup to nuts of credit management. She explains how to manage credit the traditional way as well as how to use email and social media in the 21st Century. I predict that this book will be the "go to" book for any question concerning credit management. Congratulations on a great book. You have written another winner!





Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of ten book awards, How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards, How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of 12 book awards, email: howtonegotiate@aol.com, www.marygreenwood.org

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Review of The Frugal Book Promoter Second Edition on Amazon by Carolyn Hooper-Johnson












Everything you wanted to know about book promoting and much much more., September 25, 2011
By mary greenwood


This review is from: The Frugal Book Promoter: Second Edition: How to get nearly free publicity on your own or by partnering with your publisher.


When I saw the Table of Contents for this promoting bible, I was hooked. There was a chapter on everything I wanted or needed to know. I have written three "How To" books and have had a number of reviews and awards, but I am looking to go to the next level with some fresh new ideas. In other words, I had reached a plateau and did not want to repeat the same old methods.

When I first started reading the book I immediately liked the tone. It was as though the author was in my living room saying: Mary, why don't you try this and maybe you don't want to do this." Her books, like mine, are based on her personal experience. She has done book fairs; she has taught classes and consulted with authors; she has written award-winning books. She is an expert. That is what makes the book so powerful. I have read books that make me feel guilty if I haven't done ten things for my book that day.

Yesterday, I exhibited at a book festival and most of the authors were complaining that they had few sales. I looked up the topic in my new book. The author says "Book festivals are for readers." I knew intuitively that she was right. She goes on to say that these are really networking opportunities for the writers and not that many books are sold. That shift made me feel encouraged rather than discouraged at the book festival's results. Even though I did not sell tons of books, I did meet a lot of people: readers, writers and bookstore owners. I got a few tips and gave a few tips. I reconnected with people I had seen at previous events and got some recommendations for the best venues for future events. The author was spot on.

I also checked the chapter on book awards. I have won a total of 28 book awards for my three books and thought I knew all there was to know about awards and have spoken on the subject. However, after reading that section on book awards, I realized that I was not doing enough publicizing after I won the book awards and I am going to remedy that situation. Another tip I picked up. I am now going to say Mary Greenwood, multi-award winning author, instead of award-winning author.

Of course, I wished I had seen this book when my first book came out, but I can see that this book is useful for all authors, those working on their first book and authors who already have published several books and need some new ideas. I know I will go back and reread a chapter when I am starting a new task such as a press release or am thinking about doing a new blog or sprucing up my website.

I am just starting on my new book about "How to Negotiate With Your Dog" (hint: you don't.) I am going to use The Frugal Book Promoter Second Edition, the whole way. I can't wait to get started!




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of 12 book awards, and How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of 10 book awardsl. Email, Howtointerview@aol.com and website www.MaryGreenwood.org

Friday, September 23, 2011

How to Mediate Like a Pro Listed in University of Michigan's List of Resources for Mediators.











University of Michigan

Resources for Mediators
•Beer, Jennifer E. with Eileen Stief. The Mediator's Handbook 3rd Ed., New Society Publishers, 1998.
•Bush, Robert A. Baruch and Joseph P. Folger. The Promise of Mediation: The Transformative Approach to Conflict, Revised ed., Jossey-Bass, 2005.
•Cahn, Dudley, and Ruth Anna Abigail. Managing Conflict through Communication, 3rd Ed., Allyn & Bacon, 2006.
•Cloke, Kenneth. Mediating Dangerously: The Frontiers of Conflict Resolution, Jossey-Bass, 2001.
•Cloke, Kenneth. The Crossroads of Conflict: A Journey into the Heart of Dispute Resolution, Janis Publications, 2006.
•Friedman, Gary and Jack Himmelstein. Challenging Conflict: Mediation Through Understanding, American Bar Association, Section of Dispute Resolution, 2008.
•Furlong, Gart T. The Conflict Resolution Toolbox: Models and Maps for Analyzing, Diagnosing, and Resolving Conflict, Jossey-Bass, 2005.
•Goodman, Allan. Basic Skills for the New Mediator, 2nd Ed., Soloman Publications, 2004.
•Greenwood, Mary. How to Mediate Like a Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, iUniverse, Inc. 2008.
•Herrman, Margaret S., ed. The Blackwell Handbook of Mediation, Blackwell, 2006.
•Kaner, Sam and Lenny Lind. Facilitator’s Guide to Participatory Decision-Making. 2nd Ed., Jossey-Bass, 2007.
•Katsh, Ethan and Janet Rifkin. Online Dispute Resolution, Jossey-Bass, 2001.
•Kolb, Deborah M. and Associates. When Talk Works: Profiles of Mediators, Jossey-Bass, 1997.
•Kochman, Thomas. Black and White Styles in Conflict, University of Chicago Press, Reprint edition (August 1, 1983).
•Kritek, Phyllis Beck. Negotiating at an Uneven Table: Developing Moral Courage in Resolving Our Conflicts, Jossey-Bass, 2007.
•KLang, Michael, D. and Alison Taylor. The Making of a Mediator: Developing Artistry in Practice, Jossey-Bass, 2000.
•Mayer, Bernard. The Dynamics of Conflict Resolution: A Practitioner’s Guide, Jossey-Bass, 2000.
•Menkel-Meadow, Carrie; Lela Porter Love; and Andrea Kupter Schneider. Mediation: Practice, Policy, and Ethics. Aspen Publishers, 2006.
•Moffitt, Michael L, and Robert C Bordone. The Handbook of Dispute Resolution, Jossey-Bass, 2005.
•Moore, Christopher. The Mediation Process, 3rd Edition, Jossey-Bass, 2003.
•Stulberg, Joseph B. Taking Charge, Managing Conflict, Wooster Book Company, 2002.
•Ury, William L., Jeanne M. Brett & Stephen B. Goldberg. Getting Disputes Resolved, Jossey-Bass, 1988.
•Warters, William. Mediation in the Campus Community: Designing and Managing Effective Programs, Jossey-Bass, 2008.
•Winslade, John and Gerald Monk. Practicing Narrative Mediation: Loosening the Grip of Conflict, Jossey-Bass, 2008.





howtomediate@aol.com www.marygreenwood.org

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Mary Greenwood's books have won 28 book awards










How to Interview Like a Pro has won ten book awards and is designated Rising Star and Editor's Choice by iUniverse.

1. Winner, Reader Views Book Awards, How to Category

2. Winner, Pinnacle Book Achievement Awards in Business Category.

3. Winner, Indie Excellence Awards, Career Category

4. Winner, Silver Award, ForeWord Book Awards,

5. Finalist, Eric Hoffer Book Awards

6. Finalist, Next Generation Indie Book Awards, Career Category.

7. Hnorable Mention, Readers Favorites, Business Category

8. Honorable Mention, DIY Book Awards, "How to" Category

9. Honorable Mention, New York Book Festival, "How to" Category

10. Extra Mention, Millennium Publishing Book Awards












How to Mediate Like a Pro has won twelve book awards:

1. Finalist, Next Generation Indie Books, Business Category

2. Winner, Reader Views Book Awards

3. Winner, Best Naional Book Award, Law Category

4. Best E-Book, Indie Excellence Awards

5. Best How to Book, Beach Book Festival

6. Best E-Book, New York Book Festival

7. Winner, Pinnacle Book Achievement Award

8. Silver Prize, ForeWord Book Awards

9. Runner-up DIY Book Festival

10. Sprit Award, South Florida Writers Associaton

11. Runner-up New England Book Festival

12. Runner-up London Book Festival














How to Negotiate Like a Pro has won six book awards

1. Best How To Book, DIY Book Festiva, How to Categoryl

2. Finalist Best National Book Awards, Self-help Category

3. Finalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards

4. Runner-Up New York Book Festival, E-Book Category

5. Runner-up New York Book Festival, Self-help Category

6. Honorable Mention, London Book Festival






email: howtointerview@aol.com website: www.marygreenwood.org

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Mary Greenwood is Exhibiting How to Interview Like a Pro at Florida Heritage Book Festival in St. Augustine


The Heritage Book Festival will be held on September 24 at Flagler College


The Marketplace will be open to the public
September 24, 2011

9:30–5:00

Location

The Ringhaver Student Center Building
50 Sevilla Street
The Virginia Room
St. Augustine, Florida



MARKETPLACE PARTICIPANTS

Alyson Richards Author of "Enlightened"
Early Learning Coalition
The Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Society
The Amazing Word of God
Catherine Anderson DBA Sidneys Word
Florida Book Awards
Illana Educational Press
Llumina Press “The Busy Brides Book”
Nancy H. Murray & Cynthia Euton
Whittington & Associates LLC
Latitude 29 Publishing, Inc
Out In Left Publishing
University Press
Jewels Rogers Author (A True Productions)
Authors William and Peggy Bailey
Friends of the Library
St. Augustine Historical Society
Anastasia Books
Barnes & Noble
Florida Classics Library
Phil King
Maxkat Distributors
Well Loved Books
Dementi Milestone Publishing
LJS&S Publishing
Publishing Success on Line.com
Mary Greenwood “How To Interview Like A Pro”
The Rogues Gallery Writers








Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author ofHow To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awardsBest How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers AssociationEmail: howtonegotiate@aol.comwww.marygreenwood.com

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

How to Interview Like a Pro Wins Honorable Mention in Readers Favorite Book Awards in Business Category









How to Interview Like a Pro wins Honorable Mention in the Business/Finance Category in the Readers Favorite Book Awards.

This is the Tenth Book Award for How to Interview Like a Pro:

Here are the other nine book awards:
1. Winner, Reader Views Awards
2. Winner Pinnacle Achievement Awards
3. Winner, Indie Excellence Awards
4. Winner, ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards career category
5. Finalist, Next Generation Indie Book Awards
6. Finalist, Eric Hoffer Awards
7. Honorable Mention DIY Book Festival
8. Extra Mention, Millennium Puboishing Book Awards
9. Honorable Mention, New York Book Awards

How to Mediate Like a Pro has won 12 book awards and How to Negotiate Like a Pro has won six book awards.




Mary Greenwood, HR Director, Mediator, and Attorney. Email: howtointerview@aol.com website: www.marygreenwood.com

Saturday, August 27, 2011

New book review of How to Interview Like a Pro by author, Jeannie Walker, on Amazon

















Here is my latest Amazon Book Review by Jeannie Walker, author of Fighting the Devil.

A Must Read for Job Seekers- Highly Recommend, August 27, 2011


This review is for: How to Interview Like A Pro: Forty-Three Rules for Getting Your Next Job

This is an excellent book!
Any person looking for a job (and there are plenty of us to go around) need to get this book and read it before they submit resumes or go on interviews. The author carefully points out the hows and whys of having a positive and optimistic outlook along with many other aspects of successful job hunting.

In this important book, no detail is too small to mention and each is covered in an excellent way that is straightforward and easy to understand. Job seekers need to read Mary Greenwood's book and learn what to do and what not to do before and even after a job interview.

To further understand language that some might not understand, the author has thoughtfully put an appendix with a glossary for terms a lay person might not comprehend.

I believe it is a must read book for job seekers and even employers.








Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards Finalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes Winner of five book awards, Best National Book Award, Law Category Best E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence Awards, Spirit Award, South Florida Writers AssociationEmail: howtointerview@aol.com, www.marygreenwood.com

Friday, August 26, 2011

Mary Greenwood is featured in State Farm Good Neighbor Magazine

Baby boomers are pioneering a new approach to retirement. They're leveraging their work history, learning new skills and searching for meaning--even in second careers--in their quest to get HIRED

Karen Stein, the author, starts the article with this statement:

"On her 65th birthday, the day she became eligible for Medicare, Mary Greenwood started a new job. She had retired in 2002 as a human resources director, but seven years later, driven by the economic downturn, she opted to re-enter the job market.

Mary Greenwood currently serves as head of human resources for the City of Winter Park, Florida and recently wrote a book, How to Interview Like a Pro; 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job. She says it's especially important for older job seekers to tailor cover letters and resumes to each job oopening, explaining how their experience makes them a good fit for the position."

The article goes on about how two other retirees restarted their careers.

If you have already received the article as a policy holder, please let me know.











Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help Category Finalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards Finalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help Category Honorable Mention, London Book Festival How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes Winner of five book awards Best National Book AWard, Law Category Best E-Book, New York Book Festival Best How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence Awards Spirit AWard, South Florida Writers Association Email: howtointerview@aol.com, www.marygreenwood.com

How to Interview Like a Pro is Finalist in Readers Favorite Book Awards








Mary Greenwood's How to Interview Like a Pro is a finalist in the Readers Favorite Book Awards in the Business/Finance Category. The winners will be announced on September 1, 2011 and there will be an awards ceremony in Las Vegas in November.

This is Mary Greenwood's tenth book award.

Here are the other nine book awards:
1. Winner, Reader Views Awards
2. Winner Pinnacle Achievement Awards
3. Winner, Indie Excellence Awards
4. Winner, ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards career category
5. Finalist, Next Generation Indie Book Awards
6. Finalist, Eric Hoffer Awards
7. Honorable Mention DIY Book Festival
8. Extra Mention, Millennium Puboishing Book Awards
9. Honorable Mention, New York Book Awards





Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes Winner of five book awards Best National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book Festival Best How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit Award, South Florida Writers Association Email: howtointerview@aol.com, www.marygreenwood.com

Friday, August 19, 2011

Mary Greenwood featured as Interview Expert in new E-Book by Kevin Kermes






















Here are my tips:


The biggest complaint I get from employers is that interviewees don't know anything about the companies where they are interviewing. This is really viewed as an insult and lack of interest in the job. Here are some suggestions:

1. Read the employer's website. It is amazing what you can find there.

2. Look for annual reports for the company or the department for which you are applying.

3. Check out the organizational chart.

4. Google the company to see if there are any current issues or controversies.

5. Check the local newspaper archives for the local story.

6. Find out who is interviewing you and Google them.

7. Ask for employee handbook if not on the website.

If you follow these tips, you will be interviewing like a Pro.

Mary Greenwood, HR Director, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro; 43 Rules for Getting Your Next Job


Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate Like A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awardsBest How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence Awards Spirit AWard, South Florida Writers AssociationEmail: howtointerview@aol.com www.marygreenwood.org

Monday, August 15, 2011

Mary Greenwood quoted in Kiplinger Retirement Report

















Head Off Age Bias in a Job Interview
Kiplinger.com

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was originally published in the May 2011 issue of Kiplinger's Retirement Report.

Your résumé rose to the top of the heap, and you made it through preliminary screenings. Now all you have to do is ace the interview. Job interviews can be nerve-racking, especially if you haven't been on one in many years. And, as an older applicant, you may have to prove that your age is not a drawback.

But if you know what kinds of questions you'll be asked and you have savvy answers ready to go, you'll be several steps ahead of the game. Here are four questions you should be prepared to answer on your next job interview.

Do you have the energy and skills to get the job done? Stereotypes that older workers are slow or out of touch do exist. Bill Coleman, a vice-president at RetirementJobs.com, says you can combat that stereotype before you even open your mouth by dressing in polished and modern attire. That doesn't mean you should borrow clothes from your grandchild -- you can look current in age-appropriate clothing.

You can also demonstrate that you are energetic by walking briskly and speaking enthusiastically, Coleman says. Another tip: Pulling out your iPhone or Blackberry to turn it off before the interview begins will send a message that you have embraced current technology.

Of course, you will want to offer plenty of examples of your professional accomplishments. However, it is critical that those examples be recent and tangible, says Bruce Hurwitz, chief executive officer of Hurwitz Strategic Staffing, a New York City executive-recruiting firm. You may be proud of the major client you landed two decades ago, but that is unlikely to impress your interviewer. Instead, Hurwitz recommends giving an example from the last few years, such as, "in 2009, I increased sales 500% to $175 million."

Why are you reentering the workforce, and what have you been doing during your time off? If you were laid off, took some time off to care for a sick spouse or are going back to work for financial reasons, you can be honest about that. What’s more important is how you’ve spent your time away from the office, according to Mary Greenwood, author of How to Interview Like a Pro (iUniverse, $15).If you've been volunteering or working in your industry as a part-time consultant, talk about the experience you've gained from those endeavors. You can show that you are up-to-date in your field in subtler ways, such as using the latest industry jargon. "Mention a cutting-edge book you've read, or make reference to some new industry regulations," Greenwood says.

Why are you willing to accept a demotion or lower salary? You indeed may be overqualified if you have worked three decades in your field. Greenwood says you can turn your experience into a selling point. She advises saying: "I've done everything in this field. I saw this job, and this is the part I enjoy the most, so for that reason I am willing to take a pay cut."

If you've been out of the workforce for a few years, Charles Purdy, a senior editor for Monster.com, says to admit you have a few things to learn and therefore are willing to take a job with less prestige and a lower salary. Purdy says to reframe your career move in a positive way by saying something like, "I don't think of this as a step back; I think of it as a step to the side."

Will you fit into the company's culture? This is a question that you're unlikely to be asked directly, but one that you can be sure is on your interviewer's mind. "On paper, everybody can do the job, so they're going to pick the person who seems like they're going to fit best with the boss," says John Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a staffing and career counseling firm based in Chicago.

Even if the person on the other side of the desk is young enough to be your child, that doesn't mean you can't establish an authentic connection. You may discover that you and your interviewer share the same hometown, love skiing or have volunteered for the same charitable organization. You can learn a lot about your potential employer before the interview by researching him or her on professional networking Web sites, such as LinkedIn.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was originally published in the June 2011 issue of Kiplinger's Retirement Report.








Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awardsBest How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers AssociationEmail: howtonegotiate@aol.comwww.marygreenwood.com

Book Review of How to Interview Like a Pro

















5.0 out of 5 stars
No book could possibly be timelier., August 11, 2011 By Readers Favorite "Book Reviews and Award Contest" (Hawesville, KY USA) -
This review is from: How to Interview Like A Pro: Forty-Three Rules for Getting Your Next Job (Paperback)
Reviewed by Anne B. for ReadersFavorite.com

No book could possibly be timelier than How To Interview Like a Pro. With the economy in shambles, many people are competing for the same jobs. Each hopeful interviewee must put him/herself in the best possible light. Author Mary Greenwood brings her experience and expertise to this much needed manual. She offers assistance on how to dress, shake hands, and project the right attitude and makes suggestions on preparing and delivering a good speech. In this small book the readers will find 43 tips including reference materials, examples, resources and lists.

One of the important lessons readers will find in this book is how to prepare before the interview and what to do after the interview. Greenwood writes in an easy-to-understand, crisp and clear manner. I think asking questions may be the most important and most overlooked part of an interview. Ms. Greenwood covers the topic in an excellent manner; no detail is too small for her to mention. She keeps a positive slant in this book; interviewees do not need to go into an interview with negative thoughts. By keeping a positive attitude the reader/interviewee will come across in an optimistic light. The appendix has a glossary of terms, laws pertaining to discrimination and whom to contact if you think you have been unfairly treated.

This book would make a great gift for anyone looking for a job. It would also be an asset in a high school or college life skills class.


Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author ofHow To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awardsBest How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers AssociationEmail: howtonegotiate@aol.comwww.marygreenwood.com

Saturday, July 23, 2011

How to Answer: Why Do You Want To Leave Your Current Job? How to Interview Like a Pro





Why Do You Want To Leave Your Current Job and Why Do You Want to Work Here?


This is really a tricky question, a kind of chicken or egg question and can be difficult to answer. If the new job is truly a progression and can be viewed as a "step up" from your current position with more money or more duties, this is fairly easy to explain. If you have been at the current job for less than a year, you may have a job-hopping problem. If you are having problems at the old job, you may need to be very diplomatic about explaining those issues. When you tell your prospective employer why you want to work there, don't mention money or benefits.

Here are some examples:

1. I have been here over five years and I am doing the same things over and over. I need a challenge and I believe this job will provide that.

2. I love my current job, but this new job is an opportunity with more responsibilities. It is a natural progression of my experience and expertise.

3. This is really not about leaving my old job. I see this as a great opportunity for my career. In addition, my widowed mother is sick and lives nearby. (Never give your personal situation as the first reason.)

4. Your engineering department is the best in the state and I believe this is where I want to learn about my profession.

5. I have talked to friends that work here and they have always said this is the best place to work.

6. This is really my dream job. I have always wanted to work for your company after I got some experience elsewhere.

7. I like the job. I like the location. I like the people.

If you follow these, tips, you will be interviewing like a pro.



Mary Greenwood, Human Resources Director, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of nine book awards; How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards; How To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes, Winner of twelve book awards.
Email: howtointerview@aol.com
www.marygreenwood.org

How to Interview Like a Pro Author at Decatur Book Festival September 3-4










Mary Greenwood will be signing her books on September 3, 2011 at 3:00 at the Decatur Book Festival in the Emerging Authors Tent. Her books, How to Interview Like a Pro, How to Mediate Like a Pro and How to Interview Like a Pro will be on exhibit all day on September 3 and 4, 2011.


About AJC DBF

The Largest Independent Book Festival in the Nation
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Decatur Book Festival presented by DeKalb Medical is an annual, free book festival that takes place over Labor Day weekend in Decatur, Georgia at several venues located in and around the downtown Decatur Square. Conceived in 2005 and launched in 2006, the festival brings more than 300 authors to Decatur for the holiday weekend. The authors give readings, talks, and panel discussions. The event is free and open to the public.

Authors include Pulitzer Prize winning and best-selling authors of fiction in many genres and nonfiction on diverse topics. The authors come to Decatur from across the country and international points as well.


Directions
From the MARTA rail line:
Go to Decatur Station (E–6). Take east exit for Church Street and west exit for bandstand.

From I–285 Southbound:
(Stone Mountain, Snellville, Athens, Conyers) Take Stone Mountain Freeway (US 78) west (Exit 39A). About 1/2 mile after divided highway ends and becomes Scott Boulevard. Bear left onto Church Street. Continue on Church Street about two miles to downtown Decatur.

From I–285 Northbound:
(College Park, Fayetteville, Henry Co, Airport) Get off at Covington Highway (US 278) (Exit 43) and turn left. Continue through downtown Avondale Estates (where Covington Highway becomes Main Street) past the Avondale MARTA station. Turn right onto E. Trinity Place.

From I–85:
Get off at Clairmont Road Exit (91) and go south on Clairmont about 4 1/2 miles until it dead–ends at the Old Courthouse. Turn left onto E. Ponce de Leon Avenue, go one block and turn right onto Church Street.

From North (Chamblee, Toco Hills):
Take Clairmont Road south until it dead–ends at the Old Courthouse. Turn left onto Ponce de Leon Avenue, go one block and turn right onto Church Street.

From I–20 (South):
Take Candler Road (Exit 65) north about four miles. After crossing railroad tracks, the road bears to the left and becomes E. Trinity Place.

From East (Clarkston, Scottdale):
Take East Ponce de Leon Avenue west. Just past Avondale MARTA station, turn left onto Sycamore Street.

From West (Midtown, Virginia–Highland):
Take Ponce de Leon Avenue east to downtown Decatur. After passing Old Courthouse, turn right on Church Street.

From West (Downtown Atlanta):
Take DeKalb Avenue east to downtown Decatur (DeKalb Avenue becomes Howard in Decatur). Turn left on McDonough Street at Decatur High School.

Transportation and Parking
With the historic Decatur Square located directly on MARTA’s East–West transit line, transportation to the book festival couldn’t be easier! Go to www.itsmarta.com to plan your route to the festival.

If you decide to drive, parking is plentiful in decks, metered spaces, and paid private lots. Do not park in lots posted as ‘no parking.’ Your car will be booted or towed.




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, Winner of eight book awards, How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help Category Finalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards Finalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help Category Honorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating Disputes Winner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers Association
Email: howtointerview@aol.com website: www.marygreenwood.org

Friday, July 8, 2011

Be Persistent; What I learned from my grandson








I always learn something about negotiating after a visit with my grandsons, ages 2 and 4. One of my grandsons was very interested in obtaining a special car from the Cars and Cars 2 movies, which are his all-time favorites. He was very insistent that he wanted a special car and was unwaivering in his desire for his father to buy it for him. Watching him, I learned a lot about persistence and have incorporated some of these rules into my own negotiations.

Rules on Persistence
1. Don't give up.

2. Have a one-track mind.

3. Ignore whatever is being discussed and go back to that issue every chance you get.

4. Remind the other party frequently that this is all that you want.

5. Tell the other party that you are willing to have a tantrum if you don't get it.

6. Tell the other party that there is no substitute for the item you want.

7. Keep talking about this item no matter what is being discussed.

8. If you see it, pick it up in the store and don't put it back.

9. Make it clear that you are not leaving unless you get this item.

10. If there is discussion you don't want to hear, put your fingers in your ears and say "la-la-la-la-la."

11. Explain that you do not have an identical one at home; the one at home is green and this one is blue.

12. Explain that even if this is expensive, it will be worth the cost because you will not ask for another one.

13. Even if this won't fit in the suitcase, it can be shipped home.

14. Explain that this is the only thing that can make you happy.

15. If all else fails, say,"I know you are, but what I am I."

16. If offered another item, don't look at it.

17. Don't get distracted and focus on your goal.

18. Keep saying the same thing over and over no matter what.

19. Don't compromise. Why should you?

19. Point out that your birthday is coming up.

20. If all else fails, say, "The heart likes what the heart likes."

21. I might be running away from home.

22. I really need this.

23. In fact, I really need two of these so they can race each other.

24. I really need the carrying case, too.

25. Timmy's Mommy lets him have one.

I have watched these strategies in action and am going to try them in the adult world. Try these techniques in your own negotiations and see where it takes you.




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, winner of nine book awards; How To Negotiate Like A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY Festival Runner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help Category Finalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book Award, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book Festival Best E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers Association Email: howtonegotiate@aol.com www.marygreenwood.org

Illegal Questions in a Job Interview: How to Interview Like a Pro























As an applicant, the most important thing you should know is that all questions should be job-related. If the question is not job-related and has to do with sex, race, national origin, or age, it is probably illegal. If an employer cannot ask a question directly, it cannot ask that same question indirectly, either.

Here are some illegal interview questions:

1.Illegal Questions About Race
A.Are you Asian?
An interviewer cannot ask a question about an applicant’s race as this is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Asians and Pacific Islanders are one of the five groups recognized by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which administers Title VII.

B.What race is your spouse?
Asking about a spouse or relative’s race is also prohibited by Title VII.

C.Are you an American Indian? What tribe?
Under Title VII, an interviewer cannot ask a question about race. American Indians and Alaska Natives are one of the five groups recognized by the EEOC.

D.Are you bi-racial?
Again this is prohibited by Title VII. After someone is hired, an employee can be asked to fill out an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) form, but this is prohibited in an interview.

2.Illegal Questions about National Origin
A.What kind of accent is that?
Trying to determine where someone is from by their accent is prohibited by Title VII. You cannot ask indirectly what you cannot ask directly. An interviewer may think he/she is just making conversation, but it is an improper question

B.Where were your grandparents born?
This question is never job-related and is prohibited by Title VII. An interviewer can only ask whether you can work in the US. It is a yes or no question. Anything else about national origin is inappropriate.

C.What is your native language?
Again this is illegal and is national origin discrimination. However, it is proper to ask an employee what languages he or she speaks and what his/her proficiency is in those languages.

Again this is prohibited. Even if the interviewer thinks he/she is getting to know the applicant, this is national origin discrimination.

3.Illegal Questions About Sex
A.What does your spouse think of you working at night or traveling?
There is no job-related reason to ask this. This goes back to a more patronizing time when an employer had stereotypes about working women and somehow wanted to get the spouse’s (usually husband’s) approval. An employer cannot even ask you if you have a spouse.

B.What is your spouse’s salary?
This is clearly not job-related. Companies in the past wanted to know what the husband’s salary was so it could offer the women applicant a lower salary. This is also a violation of the Equal Pay Act.

C.Are you pregnant?
This is not job-related and is specifically prohibited by Title VII and pregnancy is a protected classification under Title VII.

D.Do you have children or are you going to have children?
Any questions about children or daycare are prohibited by Title VII. There are some sexual stereotypes that women with children will have more absences than those without children. The only valid question that can be asked is whether you can work the hours of the job.

4.Illegal Questions About Age
A..How old are you?
This is not job-related and is prohibited by the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, which prohibits discrimination of anyone forty or over. There is generally no mandatory retirement now (there are exceptions for pilots and other safety sensitive positions), but an employer can ask age after an applicant is hired for retirement and health insurance purposes.

B. When were you born? When did you graduate from high school?
Again, you cannot ask indirectly what you cannot ask directly. This is not job-related and is age discrimination.

C. Don’t you think you are too old for this position?
Again this is age discrimination based on age stereotypes. If the job is a physical one, you can ask all applicants to demonstrate that they can do the job duties as long as the older applicants are not singled out.

D. Are you a grandparent?
Again the employer may think he/she is making conversation, but it can be perceived as age discrimination. Again there is no job-related reason to be asking this.

1.If you are asked one of these illegal questions, how do you respond?
The answer to this depends on how much you want the job. If you still want the job, you may want to give an answer that lets them know you know it is illegal.

Here are some examples:
A. I am sure you know that you cannot ask that question. However, I have nothing to hide. I have two children three and four, and they go to daycare.
B. Not that this is job-related under federal law. I do have two children. Their father takes them and I pick them up from daycare.
C. I know that this is an illegal question and I am going to refuse to answer it. It is not job-related so I assume this refusal will not be taken against me in the interview process.
D. If you are really mad and are no longer interested in the job, you could say something like this: “I know these are illegal questions and I am going to stop by the EEOC office on my home to file a complaint.

If you follow these guidelines, you will be interviewing like a pro.






Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, Winner of nine book awards; How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY Festival Runner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law Category Best E-Book, New York Book Festival, Best How To Book, Beach Book Festival Best E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers Association Email: howtointerview@aol.com www.marygreenwood.org

Sunday, July 3, 2011

Most Highlighted Passages on Kindle by Jane Austen and Suzanne Collins







Amazon Kindle has a new feature of keeping track of the "Most Highlighted Passages of All Time." Here is the latest, which includes Jane Austen in the first and fourth place and Suzanne Collins of the Hunger Games in second and third. There is also a daily listing.

Most Highlighted Passages of All Time

1. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
Highlighted by 4743 Kindle users
Pride and Prejudiceby Jane Austen

2. It takes ten times as long to put yourself back together as it does to fall apart.”
Highlighted by 4390 Kindle users
Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games)
by Suzanne Collins


3. Because sometimes things happen to people and they’re not equipped to deal with them.
Highlighted by 4001 Kindle users
Catching Fire (The Second Book of the Hunger Games)
by Suzanne Collins


4. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us."
Highlighted by 3965 Kindle users
Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen

5. Those three things—autonomy, complexity, and a connection between effort and reward—are, most people agree, the three qualities that work has to have if it is to be satisfying.
Highlighted by 3918 Kindle users
Outliers: The Story of Success
by Malcolm Gladwell




Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author ofHow To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awardsBest How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers Association
Email: howtonegotiate@aol.com
www.marygreenwood.org

"Popular Highlights" feature on Kindle Amazon a good tool for Readers and Authors
















I just noticed a new feature on Amazon Kindle. The listing shows some of the sections highlighted by the readers. There is a pop-up that says " five other people highlighted this part of the book." The following are some of the Popular Highlights from How to Mediate Like a Pro. This is a very helpful feature for the author as well. It shows which sections resonate with the reader.


Popular Highlights


"If we are going to resolve this, we need to look to the future, not the past. You need to get beyond the hurt you are feeling and look at the impact. I know that this has been painful, but we need to discuss these issues."
Highlighted by 5 Kindle users

"What if the other party rejects this? How can you sweeten the deal?How can you close the deal? What if the other party rejects this? What is your backup plan?"
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

"Let’s not get bogged down with all the details; let’s look for solutions. Dwelling in the past can be counterproductive. Let’s look at the present to see what can resolve this case."
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

"How can we get beyond this blame game and move forward to a solution? Is it important to you that the case get settled? It is not really important as to who is right or who is wrong."
Highlighted by 4 Kindle users

"I am trying to understand what you really want. I think you are joking, right? Tell me what you really want."
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users

"A take it or leave it approach has no place in mediation. An all or nothing approach does not allow both parties to participate."
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users

"What is important is how to resolve the dispute so both parties can walk away somewhat satisfied."
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users

"I try to explain that fault is not the essence of the mediation. It is not a question of who is right or who is wrong but how to resolve the situation."
Highlighted by 3 Kindle users





Mary Greenwood, Mediator, Attorney and Author of How to Interview Like a Pro, Winner of nine book awards; How To Negotiate LIke A Pro: 41 Rules for Resolving Disputes, Winner of six book awards Best How To Book, DIY FestivalRunner Up, New York Book Festival, E-Book and Self-Help CategoryFinalist ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year AwardsFinalist, Best National Book Awards, Self-Help CategoryHonorable Mention, London Book FestivalHow To Mediate Like A Pro: 42 Rules for Mediating DisputesWinner of five book awardsBest National Book AWard, Law CategoryBest E-Book, New York Book FestivalBest How To Book, Beach Book FestivalBest E-Book, Indie Excellence AwardsSpirit AWard, South Florida Writers AssociationEmail: howtomediate@aol.com
www.marygreenwood.org